hope’s comfort

“Hope is important because it can make the present moment less difficult to bear. If we believe that tomorrow will be better, we can bear a hardship today.”  ~Thich Nhat Hanh, Clergyman

“Let your hopes, not your hurts, shape your future.” ~Robert H. Schuller, Clergyman
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your voice brings a smile to my heart,
with words that soothe me as if an infant rocked by cradle,
your eyes, gentle yet focused, speak to me as if an audible language,
sharing the story of your soul… Continue reading

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Moments

“The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.” ~ Martin Luther King Jr.

“Our faith comes in moments; our vice is habitual.” ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson

Originally posted on Facebook–February, 2010

Time is a frustrating element of life. It just keeps going. Our lives are essentially a cumulative span of personally experienced moments. Some possess photograph clarity. We can review others in our minds like a favorite episode of Seinfeld. And yet, there are some moments that possess us, and hold us captive. They never let us walk away. Continue reading

FROZEN in Fear and its Relationship to Love

 “Love will thaw. Of course!” ~Queen Elsa

“Wanna build a snowman?” ~Princess Anna

INTRODUCTION

Frozen is a wonderfully constructed animated movie that I believe speaks at surprisingly great depth about the relationship between fear and love. As is true in real life, all of the characters in Frozen—except for, maybe, Olaf the snowman—have unique challenges in dealing with fear and loving others in a healthy manner. After having watched the movie a few times, I believe that the movie’s screenwriters developed the characters to possess personalities that would accurately reflect their behaviors in the story–grounding this fantasy tale with a realistic human element. Within this writing, I share my thoughts about how fear affects the ability and manner in which the movie’s major characters exhibit love towards one another—as well as its likely effects on their self-perceptions. With each character’s fears being different in scope and focus, these fears influence their ability and manner in which they love others to varying degrees. Character examinations will begin with Hans of the Southern Isles–who very well may not be capable of anything other than self-love. Concluding these examinations shall be Queen Elsa of Arendelle, who in my opinion is the most complex–and in many respects, the most realistic–character within Frozen. If you are curious as to how I can justify a woman whose magical powers can control winter’s elements as the most realistic character in the movie…you will just need to read onward. Continue reading