incongruence

a square peg beside a round hole,
complimentary in function, yet fails to fit,
purposed into service, though unfulfilled its role,
and like musical chairs, stands where others sit, Continue reading

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An Unimaginable Relationship

In Power Evangelism, Wimber spelled out his understanding of the impoverished framework that is so basic to Westerners that they cannot even see the assumptions as assumptions but rather as fundamental truths about the world. Westerners, he said, assume that we live in a truth only through empirical study and rational thought. We feel confident in our ability to control our environment, and we feel little need for any help from anything outside ourselves. We assume that only that which has been tested and proven is true. And finally, we accept reason as the only and highest authority in life. This secular, self-reliant, materialist, and rational culture is, Wimber argued, the greatest impediment to a Christian’s personal encounter with Christ. Now, he argued, we live in a world in which most intellectuals have abandoned the hope that we have a purpose for being, and we live in a moral crisis and a miasma of existential doubt (Tanya Luhrmann, When God Talks Back, p. 317).

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There appears to be a growing approach to practicing Christianity—particularly in the United States—that concerns me. Maybe this is simply a case of semantics. I, however, believe that it’s much more divergent and deadly. What some would probably argue to be semantics, I consider fundamental differences of core belief; for these semantics lead to differences in how individuals come to know and relate to God. Subsequently, there is a schism in Christian orthodoxy (“correct belief”), which is noticeable when considering Christian orthopraxy (“correct practice”). And—truthfully—it’s always been there… Continue reading

Wading

Originally posted on Facebook, 2008

What has happened to depth in life? Conversations that receive the token comment, “That’s deep,” rarely are anything remotely resembling. Movies seem to fall into two categories now. They are either 1) re-purposed stories that have held the test of time (yes, comic books fall into this category) or 2)  a spectacle of cinematic special effects and sounds, with a small dash of plot to hold onto some sense of grounded meaning. Millions of people spend their evenings staring at their high-definition, flat-screen TVs, ensconced within the vapid dialogues of reality show celebrities. Where are we producing fruit? Continue reading

Worth

It is a question that I believe all people must ask themselves at one point: “What is my worth?” Well, I know that I have asked myself that question many times, at different points in my life.  Most times the question is not phrased aloud, but festering subconsciously—only able to be recognized once the answer to the question is made visible in my actions; occurring at a later date.

A more frequently noted self-reflection question would be “what is my purpose?” When speaking with others philosophically, one’s purpose is the question that typically arises; maybe, because it is a safer question on which to dwell. While there may be some correlation between one’s purpose and one’s worth, it is possible to have little purpose and great worth. So too, is it possible for one to have little worth, and great purpose. It is far more unlikely, however, for one to prefer that they have little worth, regardless of whether or not they possess great purpose. I would suggest that most people believe that they can find purpose later, as long as they have worth.

Or, maybe people speak of purpose more frequently because they believe it is a determinant of worth. I think that, at times, this has been my mindset. And maybe, the better question is “WHERE do I find my worth?” Yes, I think that this is the more accurate question. Continue reading